WOD

What is WOD?

Defined as the “Workout of the Day” and these are constantly varied functional movements performed at a high intensity.  The WOD’s may consist of one or more of the 9 fundamental movements along with an Olympic lift, a power-lift, pull-ups, dips, rope climb, push-ups, sit-ups, bike, run, swim and row. The WOD descriptions are very literal; if it says “squats” it means bodyweight (aka “air squats”) – no added weight, unless it says back squats, front squats or overhead squats.
A “rep” or repetition is one iteration of a movement. One bench press, one squat. A “set” is a group of reps: 10 reps =10 bench presses, 10 squats. 3 sets is do a group of repetitions, rest, repeat, rest, repeat. So, 3 sets of 10 (reps) is 10/rest/10/rest/10. The rest interval is up to your recovery time, and the goal of the WOD. Obviously, if it’s a timed WOD, you want to rest less.

Rest and reps are frequently inverse. Sometimes a WOD says deadlift 3-2-2-1-1-1. This means a set of 3 reps, a set of 2 reps, another set of 2, a “set of one” aka a “single.” This few reps indicates maximal load, and indicates longer rest times.

If the WOD says 21-15-9 reps of bench and pullups in “rounds” (or any two or three exercises as given) you do 21 reps of exercise 1, followed by 21 reps of exercise 2, and 21 reps of exercise 3 if there is a third one. Now do 15 of the first, 15 of the second…9 of the first, 9 of the second.